Archive for What’s Hanging In The Shop?

Artist Reception For Jacob LaBarre

Sunday, May 12th, 3-5PM

Field Studies – 2008-2019

Jacob LaBarre

15-30 min watercolor sketches are an immensely satisfying way to pass the time and get to know a building, place, or test ideas. I enjoy the imperfect translation these paints make between objects, light, my eyes, my brain, my hands, the paints, the brush and the paper. Inspired by the drawings of friends and teachers Fred Birchman, Judith Swain, Bob Hull and Frank Harmon, I have learned to treasure the creation of these artifacts, and I believe much can be gained by just doing the work. Thanks for looking at them and I hope to make more.

Italy & Art

This weekend at Madrona Wine we are exploring Italian terroir.  Terroir is how a particular region’s climate, soils and terrain affect the taste of wine. we’ll be tasting through a full line up both Saturday & Sunday.  Sunday is also the Artist Reception for our new show. Scroll down for more info or just come on by for a look.

Saturday:
Tenuta Col Sandago Extra  Dry Prosecco  $18
2015 Colpaola, Verdicchio di Matelica $17
2014 Filodivino,  Lacrima di Moro d’Alba Diana $12

2016 Tiziano Mazzoni,  Colline Novaresi  Nebbiolo del Monteregio $25
2013 Giovanna Madonia, Ombroso Sangiovese di Romagna DOC Riserva $32

Sunday we have a pair from Piedmont.
2017 Ca’ Gialla Roero Arneis  $11
Hints of white and citrus fruit notes of savory and freshness. Organic.
2016 Riva Leone Barbera  $12
Fresh, with mature plum scents this easy drinking Barbera is great with dinner or by itself.

Sunday 3pm to 5pm is the Artist’s Reception for our new duo show by Amy Hanada Nikaitani and Michelle Kumata.

Michelle Kumata’s Nihonmachi series is based on pre-WWII photos of the Japanese American community, when Seattle’s Japantown was a bustling, vibrant neighborhood. The imagers were inspired by found photos and the Takano Studio Collection at Wing Luke Museum of the Asian Pacific American Experience.

Amy Hanada Nikaitani was born in 1923 on Halloween Day in Seattle, Washington in a hotel near 6th and Weller which her father operated. Imagine, now she is living in Washington Terrace on 6th and Yesler!!! Born to immigrants from Japan, Kuramatsu and Matsu Takami Hanada.

She had been interested in the female figure all her life, playing with paper dolls as a child, drawing fashion figures and bathing beauties on her notebooks and also on her stationary as she corresponded with many GI friends during WWII.

After high school she hoped to attend art school. Her father, concerned for her financial security, sent her to the Charette School of Costume Design in Seattle, instead. She had only started her studies, when World War II and the internment orders interrupted her plans.

Her entire family moved to Wyoming to avoid the internment. From there, she married and became a mother of four. She put her artistic aspirations on hold, but in the back of her mind thought she would return to art someday.

While raising her children she attended Edison Technical School and studied at the Burnley School of Art.

After having a fifth child she went to work at Boeing in a Graphics Group for 18 years. During this time she continued her interest in the female figure, becoming a fixture in local figure drawing groups.

Madrona Wine Merchants offers free wine tastings featuring 4-5 selections on a theme every Saturday from 2 until the bottles run out and on Sunday, we offer a mini-tasting of two wines all day from 11-5.

Julian Birchman Artist Reception

Sunday, January 13th, 3-5PM


PORTRAITS

Julian Birchman

January 6 – March 3

opening reception – Sunday, January 13 – 3 to 5pm

Whenever I sit down to doodle, I always draw a man. I draw a variation of several different dudes that I have in my visual library. I don’t do this consciously, it’s just what comes out. As a result whenever I need to draw a female character or a non-masculine appearing person, I feel stumped. So I took this opportunity to draw 20 women as an exercise to break up a bad habit.

-Julian Birchman

Damp & Cloudy

It’s a cool grey weekend here in Madrona, but “damp and cloudy” is not the description of our weekend tastings. We have a full line or bright and clear wines to try that will chase the grey away.  We are also having the artist reception for our new show by David Kane.

Saturday, we are celebrating the upcoming harvest with a tasting of five Natural, Organic and Biodynamic wines. 
2014 Finca Viladellops Ancestral Pet Nat $28
100% Xarel-lo Vermil – 
2017 Dolina , Guerila $19
100% Pinela
2016 Domaine Victor Sornin Beaujolais Villages – $17
100% Gamay
2015 Château les Croisille, Croizillon  Cahors $14
Malbec
2014 Turner Pageot Le Rouge $20
80% Grenache, 20% Syrah

Sunday we are pouring two affordable wines from Italy.  We’ll start off with some late summer bubbles followed by a medium-bodied Nero d’Avola from Sicily.
La Biòca Ricciante  $10
Freisa 85%, Barbera 15%
This extra dry Vino Spumante pairs well fish-based main dishes, meat or mushroom-based appetizers. Fresh, crispy, red berries, bell pepper, strawberry, lime, medium-body, high acidity, bone dry.   Was $15, Now $10
2012 Curatolo Arini Coralto  $11
Nero d’Avola
Violets and red cherries, plums and hints of white pepper. On the palate this wine is medium-bodied with beautifully intense red fruit characters matched by delicate notes of spices and soft tannins.

Also Sunday from 3pm to 5pm artist David C. Kane will be at the shop introducing our new show Enigmas for Madrona.  Stop on in, meet the artist and see the new show.

Madrona Wine Merchants offers free wine tastings featuring 4-5 selections on a theme every Saturday from 2 until the bottles run out and on Sunday we offer a mini-tasting of two wines all day from 11-5.

Enigmas For Madrona

Artwork by David C. Kane



Enigmas for Madrona

Works Excerpted from the Famous 37 Little Enigmas

By David C. Kane

September 2 thru November 4

Opening reception: September 9, 3 p.m. to 5 p.m.

Madrona Wine Merchants

1127 34th Ave, Seattle, WA 98122

For years, David C. Kane was an eccentric yet beloved fixture of the Seattle art scene.

Year after year he produced work praised by cognoscenti for its eerie charm, sardonic humor, and strange iconography. Since decamping for the Skagit Valley four years ago, his work has been seldom seen in Seattle, so getting to see a recent body of work is a real treat.

Let’s hope you cherry nosed wine bibbers appreciate what you’re looking at.

Take one home and watch it come alive after the second or third bottle of claret.

Marc Wenet Artist Reception

& Wine Tasting

Sunday, April 15th, 3-5pm

Come meet Marc Wenet and view his show, Past Experiences — and try a couple of wines.

Madrona Wine Merchants offers free wine tastings featuring 4-5 selections on a theme every Saturday from 2pm until the bottles run out and on Sunday we offer a mini-tasting of two wines all day from 11-5pm.

Views of the Olympic Coast

March 4th-April 29th

Artist Reception, March 25th, 3-5pm

Ozette Trees 2017

Oil on Canvas

Having grown up in the suburbs of Long Island, I had no idea the Olympic National Park would have such a deep effect on me. I have camped and hiked there in all weather extremes. These paintings depict a few of those days.

www.ericbrownfinearts.com
elbrown3000@gmail.com

New Art Show In January

Suzanne Brooker

Painting with Paper: Collage Works


January 3rd-February 25th

Artist Reception Sunday January 14th, 3-5pm

My interest in collage began in 1980’s as an extension of my work as a filmmaker. Like a single still taken from a movie, each piece explores the interaction between photographic realness and abstract imagery.

Madrona Wine Merchants offers free wine tastings featuring 4-5 selections on a theme every Saturday from 2 until the bottles run out and on Sunday we offer a mini-tasting of two wines all day from 11-5.

Charles Prutting Artist Reception

And Wine Tasting

Charles Prutting: The Discovery Park Series

November 1st-Dececember 31st

Opening Reception November 12th

“Nature’s lessons could be learned by bringing the soul to her, and letting it behold itself as in a mirror; the teaching could be passed on to others by means of art –
mainly the art of landscape painting.”

– Arthur Wesley Dow, 1920

“This where they walked and swam, hunted, dance and sang.”

– R.E.M., 1986

What began as a study and exercise in painting, developed into a love and wonder of a unique place. A love of attempting to capture this beauty, this given moment in this place. A wonder of the past times, of those previous generations who engaged this place. And though each generation tries to put its imprint on the place, the land endures our follies. The land leaves its imprint on us.

As I became educated of the place I was exploring and experiencing, my infatuation with it grew. The physical beauty that was before me had witnessed, as all places have, a storied history both “recorded” and unrecorded. The cliffs of the Magnolia Bluff expose a record of the Ice Age and an archaeological history of 25,000 years. How many souls have trekked along these shores, navigated these woods? How many people have fallen in love, or suffered loss, while in this place? How many hold a cherished memory that occurred here?

As for the recent “recorded” history, it too had me intrigued. In 1857, the “Magnolia Bluff” was misnamed during a U.S. Coast Survey when Lt. George Davidson mistakenly identified the red-barked madrona trees as magnolias. In 1898, acres of old growth were cleared to construct Fort Lawton. Since that time, this land has witnessed calvary troops, artillery installations, Presidential visits, soldier baseball games and dances, as well as prisoners of war, lynchings and other miscarriages of justice. And now, at 534 acres, it is the largest city park in Seattle, populated with photographers, cyclists, runners, bird watchers, naturalists, beachcombers. And at least one awe struck painter.

The park has left its imprint on me, and most likely countless others. In a sense, it is a mirror held up to us revealing the environmental challenges that confront us today with all places. What legacy will we pass along with the land to future generations? Will we cherish and nurture it, provide respectful stewardship and husbandry towards it so that it may be experienced by them as we have had the good fortune to?

I wish to express my gratitude to the Seattle Parks and Recreation and the Friends of Discovery Park. Your efforts in maintaining this wonderful landscape are greatly appreciated.

  • Charles Prutting

Madrona Wine Merchants offers free wine tastings featuring 4-5 selections on a theme every Saturday from 2 until the bottles run out and on Sunday we offer a mini-tasting of two wines all day from 11-5.

Amanda Teicher Artist Reception,

September 3rd, 3-5PM

Amanda Teicher

Hidden Depths and Distance Heights

August 30th – October 29th
Artist Reception, September 3rd, 3-5pm

My paintings relate to forces that are below human activity or above it. The seashells in these paintings are made by creatures that live on the ocean floor; the clay in the ceramic objects comes from beneath the earth’s surface. The unconscious is represented by lava and blood. Floating objects suggest activity far above the earth’s surface. While we humans remain on the earth’s surface, our activity cannot be removed from these subterranean and atmospheric forces.

For a quick video look at the exhibit…

Madrona Wine Merchants offers free wine tastings featuring 4-5 selections on a theme every Saturday from 2 until the bottles run out and on Sunday we offer a mini-tasting of two wines all day from 11-5.